Ben Gaylard

Bright Side and Suicide Rural Victorian comic Ben Gaylard has had some dark

chapters in his life – things he calls

“interesting” – so how does he turn deep and horrific events into a stand-up show? “I think the main thing is to take ownership over it,” he says.

I guess the way I’ve turned [darkness] into comedy is with a bit of rage ± I’m angry! But it comes out quite funny and also hopefully touching to people.”

In his show, Bright Side and Suicide,

Gaylard looks at the dark stuff in our lives and tries to switch it around.

Referring to the brutal murder of Melbourne comic Eurydice Dixon, Gaylard was unsure whether he should comment because he’s not,

as he puts it, a part of the Melbourne comedy scene.

I guess the way I’ve turned [darkness] into comedy is with a bit of rage ± I’m angry! But it comes out quite funny and also hopefully touching to people.”

“I try and turn that [message] into humour,

but I always end with a serious comment about where we’re at,” he says.

“It’s not just women who are affected by this, it’s everyone. This violence, this culture of ‘it’s okay’, that people can be property, I think that’s wrong.

“I guess that’s where my comedy comes from ± challenging people to think. It’s what I do all the time and bring it to my comedy.”

“I guess the show might not be for everyone, it might trigger some stuff, but I’ve been through it. My stuff is quite PC.”

In his shows, Gaylard says they’re always a cry out for people to be better. Gaylard says the birth of his infant son and his journey into fatherhood is a massive influence on his work.

I guess the way I’ve turned [darkness] into comedy is with a bit of rage ± I’m angry! But it comes out quite funny and also hopefully touching to people.”

“The thing about it is ± and I really want to get this across in the show ± no matter what comes into your life after an event that changes it, you hang onto that.

Being from a rural area, Gaylard’s show is likely to bring a different spin to the city circuit. “

I guess the way I’ve turned [darkness] into comedy is with a bit of rage ± I’m angry! But it comes out quite funny and also hopefully touching to people.”

It’s something different but people can still relate,” he says.

and I try to make it into a way that city folk can understand, because we are different.

“I guess that’s where my comedy comes from ± challenging people to think. It’s what I do all the time and bring it to my comedy.”

The forward stuff is definitely what a great community it is, one that rallies when someone has cancer or this or that.

“I guess that’s where my comedy comes from ± challenging people to think. It’s what I do all the time and bring it to my comedy.”

“I guess the way I’ve turned [darkness] into comedy is with a bit of rage … But it comes out quite funny and also hopefully touching to people.”

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