Captain Mercator Cooper

Mercator Cooper was Long Island’s most famous whaling

Captain during his career at sea, and perhaps one of the most famous whaling captains in the world.

Many could boast of great adventures, but it would be hard to top Cooper.

The Southampton mariner took the whaleship Manhattan from Sag Harbor to the South Pacific in 1845.

When he set out, he was not looking for a reason to visit Japan, a closed society that did not tolerate most foreigners.

Eight years earlier, the last American ship to attempt to visit the feudal nation had been driven away by cannonballs.

Some shipwrecked foreign sailors who washed up on Japanese beaches were killed.

But when Cooper glimpsed an opportunity to visit Japan, he didn’t hesitate.

The Manhattan sailed from Sag Harbor on 9 November 1843. More than two years later Cooper stopped at St.

Peter’s Island off the coast of Japan to look for water and firewood. His logbook entry for 15 March 1845 details that he came across something else:

“We found 11 Japanese men that have been cast away” or shipwrecked.

“We took them on board.” The following day “we fell in with a Japanese junk with her stern stove in and 11 men on board.” Cooper rescued them as well.

Upon reaching the Japanese coast, he put three or four of the Japanese sailors aboard local craft to tell the shogun of Jeddo—the name of Tokyo at the time—that he planned to sail into the bay to hand over the rest of the rescued sailors.

On 18 April a barge carrying an emissary from the emperor arrived to inform the captain that he could enter the bay.

Cooper’s log noted that “about three hundred Japanese boats with about 15 men in each took the ship in tow.”

Once the Manhattan was anchored in the bay cannonballs. Some shipwrecked foreign sailors who washed up on Japanese beaches were killed.

But when Cooper glimpsed an opportunity to visit Japan, he didn’t hesitate.

The Manhattan sailed from Sag Harbor on 9 November 1843.

More than two years later Cooper stopped at St. Peter’s Island off the coast of Japan to look for water and firewood.

His logbook entry for 15 March 1845 details that he came across something else: “We found 11 Japanese men that have been cast away” or shipwrecked. “We took them on board.”

The following day “we fell in with a Japanese junk with her stern stove in and 11 men on board.” Cooper rescued them as well.

On 18 April a barge carrying an emissary from the emperor arrived to inform the captain that he could enter the bay.

Cooper’s log noted that “about three hundred Japanese boats with about 15 men in each took the ship in tow.”

Once the Manhattan was anchored in the bay, “they formed their boats around the ship with a guard of about three thousand men.

They took all of our arms out to keep till we left.

There were several of the nobility came on board to see the ship. They appeared very friendly.”

But there were limits to the local hospitality.

For more information: ฝากขั้นต่ำ 50 บาท